Wait a minute. Children are choosing to read after school, for fun?

Yes!

Ms. Coppola and I have been facilitating a book club with third, fourth, and fifth graders after school since April.  Our students have been enjoying reading Judy Blume's humorous classic Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing aloud to each other.

We have had countless productive discussions about the book, its characters, our predictions, sibling relationships, parent supervision, and even what living in New York City back in the seventies was like. With the lovely spring weather, we've been able to read outdoors most days, and we've even had fun snacks like apples, lollipops, chips, popcorn, and delicious cupcakes!  We are wrapping up the book this week, and the students hope to share a skit with the lower school as a culminating activity soon. 

This small, multi-age book club provides students with a safe place to develop their literacy skills and share opinions and feelings about reading.  We recommend that more families get involved with book clubs with their children this summer.  If book clubs are not an option, you might consider reading the same book along with your child and having discussions about the book.  What a wonderful way to spend time together! 

Ms. Coppola and I continue to enjoy this time as much as the children each day, and we can't believe how quickly our book club time is coming to an end. In the wise words, of Theodore Geisel, otherwise known as Dr. Seuss, "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go."  Chase kids love reading, and boy are we ever going places!

 

~ Mrs. Caitlin Hurtgen
Fifth Grade Teacher

Seventh Grade Scientists Use Virtual Reality Lab to Explore Intricacies of the Human Body

Biologist. Gastroenterologist. Neurosurgeon. While our seventh grade scientists are many years removed from practicing medicine, their work in the zSpace provided more than a cursory glance at a 3-D dissection of the human brain, opportunities to explore the digestive tract, and an analysis of veins, arteries, muscles, and bones. Seeing diagrams in a textbook or on an iPad- and even looking at a model of rattling bones and body parts- cannot compare with the virtual reality of picking up a digital pen, choosing a tool to measure, dissect, rotate or rebuild and experiencing the intricacies of the human body.

Technology is only as effective as the instructional integration of information and application of knowledge that is practiced by each student. Seventh graders were challenged to compare a human brain to a rat’s brain, to determine why people with ALS still have feeling in their legs, even though they can no longer control their leg muscles, and to explain how nerve damage in one part of the body can lead to loss of feeling or paralysis in another. If the sheer magnitude of this learning experience leaves you feeling momentary visual problems often described as “seeing stars,” stop by the zSpace and see our scientists at work; they will certainly be able to explain why this happens!

With critical thinking questions in hand, iPad at the ready and a steady hand, our middle students are just a few years away from picking up a scalpel, realizing in seventh grade that an experience in virtual reality may just be the real world career that fulfills their lives.

~ Nedra Gusenburg
Writing Specialist

A unique melding of new and old technology took place on campus recently.  The two Geometry classes spent several days last week in groups wandering around the campus acting as surveyors with a very high-tech device (their iPad) and a very low-tech device (a straw) attached to the top of it.

They were using an app on their iPads which turned them into "inclinometers" (which measure angles) with the straw as their viewfinder, along with another low-tech device (a tape measure), to determine "angles of elevation" or "angles of depression." Their task then was to use basic trigonometric ratios to find the height of a number of things on campus, such as St. Margaret's Hall or our beautiful Copper Beech tree below the South Porch.

After gathering their data, each group created a packet of tables and drawings to illustrate their use of trigonometry to better understand how mathematics is used every day in the "real-world." 

~ Dean Murphy
US Math Teacher

 

Tuesday May 29th Halo Nominations

Chase has received 16 nominations.

1.BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTOR IN A PLAY:

       Westbrook High School: Ben Schrek as Edward Markley in Radium Girls

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Shawn Parent as Gower/Mr. Partridge/Director 2 in It's A Wonderful Life

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Zach Geiger as Policeman in The Visit

●       Chase Collegiate School: Michael Nejaime as Hortensio in The Taming Of The Shrew

●       Chase Collegiate School: Garrett Fisher as Baptista in The Taming Of The Shrew

       Pomperaug High School: Justin Callanan as Dimitri Andropov in Cloak And Dagger

       Farmington High School: Aaron Robair as Reverend Parris in The Crucible

       Classical Magnet School: Kian Child as Charles Webb in Our Town

       Newington High School: Matthew Plourd as Uncle Stanley in George Washington Slept Here

 

2. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTRESS IN A PLAY:

       Immaculate High School: Nicole Kolitsas as Feste in Twelfth Night

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Lucy Kucharski as Violet in It's A Wonderful Life

       Westbrook High School: Charlotte Barton as Nancy Jane Harlan in Radium Girls

       Farmington High School: Samantha Scheidel as Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible

       Torrington High School: Emily Vazquez as Governor Prince in Romeo And Juliet

       Classical Magnet School: Brianna Phillips as Myrtle Webb in Our Town

 

3. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTOR IN A MUSICAL:

       Farmington High School: Matt Thureson as Motel in Fiddler On The Roof

       Bristol Eastern High School: Logan Zdun as Dean Hyde in All Shook Up

       Guilford High School: Jake Gladwin as Billy in School Of Rock

       Torrington High School: Will Wilson as Benny in In The Heights

       Stonington High School: Erich Phelps as Dwayne Rhodes in 9 To 5

       The Taft School: Peter Dzubay as Willard Hewitt in Footloose

       Lauralton Hall: Liam Fryer as Sir Dennis Galahad in Spamalot

       Newington High School: Jack DeGirolamo as Gaston in Beauty And The Beast

       Notre Dame High School: Antonio Mantero as The Mysterious Man in Into The Woods

 

4. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL:

       The Taft School: Cami Long as Rusty in Footloose

       Farmington High School: Elena Jimenez-McDermott as Tzeitel in Fiddler On The Roof

       Guilford High School: Kassidy Planas as Tomika in School Of Rock

       Bristol Eastern High School: Anna Korpanty as Lorraine in All Shook Up

       St. Luke's School: Amelia Wyckoff as Little Sally in Urinetown

       The Taft School: Marley Thompson as Cinderella in Into The Woods

       Stonington High School: Ivy Allik as Marmee in Little Women

       Newington High School: Michelle Goffman as Madame de la Grande Bouche in Beauty And The Beast

       Wolcott High School: Elizabeth Lacombe as Stepmother in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

 

5. BEST COMIC MALE PERFORMANCE IN A PLAY:

       Pomperaug High School: Conrad McDonald as Rick in A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Holy Cross High School: John Vito as Carlos Homenides de Histangua in A Flea In Her Ear

       Holy Cross High School: Nick Pietrarazio as Camille Chandebise in A Flea In Her Ear

       Guilford High School: Tyler Felson in Metamorphoses

       Watertown High School: Jewell Hearon as Plato Voltaire in The Great All-American Musical Disaster

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Jacob Wilkins as Dragoman in Appointment With Death

 

6. BEST COMIC FEMALE PEFORMANCE IN A PLAY:

       St. Luke's School: Katie Libman as Frances in Five Women Wearing The Same Dress

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Helen Adams as Annie/Director 3 in It's A Wonderful Life

       Classical Magnet School: Linda Shewokis as Smee in Peter And The Starcatcher

       Guilford High School: Indira Greif for Metamorphoses

       Pomperaug High School: Zakeeyah Johnson as Dixie in A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Classical Magnet School: Gabby Butler as Professor Wilard/Simon Stimson in Our Town

●       Chase Collegiate School: Emily Segal as Widow/Peter in The Taming Of The Shrew

       Holy Cross High School: Jessica Sanchez as Antoinette Plucheaux in A Flea In Her Ear

       Watertown High School: Emily Marie Dowlng as Baby Bernice in The Great All-American Musical Disaster

 

7. BEST COMIC MALE PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL:

       Wolcott High School: Joe Cantamessa as Lionel in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Dior Barnes as Bobby in Memphis

       Torrington High School: Tyus Phengkaen as Sonny in In The Heights

       Lauralton Hall: Antonio Mantero as Prince Herbert in Spamalot

       Shepaug Valley High School: Michael Iannazzo as Wally in The 1940s Radio Hour

       Immaculate High School: Robert Fontenelli as Eugene in Grease

       Notre Dame High School: Alex Barbour as Cinderella's Prince in Into The Woods

 

8. BEST COMIC FEMALE PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL:

       Cromwell High School: Samantha Barrett as Enid in Legally Blonde

       Watertown High School: Eliya Brennan as Joy in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Newington High School: Stephanie Treviso as Babette in Beauty And The Beast

       Immaculate High School: Marina Kolitsas as Patty Simcox in Grease

       Torrington High School: Vivian Jimemez-Rijo as Daniela in In The Heights

       Westbrook High School: Emma Parkhurst as Enid Hoopes in Legally Blonde

       The Taft School: Cami Long as Little Red in Into The Woods

       Wolcott High School: Melissa Green as Joy in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

●       Chase Collegiate School: Maggie McGuire as Mazeppa in Gypsy

 

9. BEST COSTUME DESIGN:

       Guilford High School: Julia Hyman, Casey Elkin, Samantha Doria & Lyndsay Chapman for Metamorphoses/School Of Rock

       St. Luke's School: Chloe Kekedjian for Boeing-Boeing/Urinetown

       Shepaug Valley High School: Emily Ward for The 1940s Radio Hour/The Stranger

       Ellington High School: Julia Dobosz, Alison Bennett, Kavya Sajeev & Lexi Cantin for The Endless Arc

       Classical Magnet School: Linda Shewokis for Peter And The Starcatcher

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Samantha Amenta for It's A Wonderful Life

       Immaculate High School: Ilona Ludanyi for Grease

       Westbrook High School: Christine Banks, Kelsey Xenelis, Tirzah Blomquist, Merry Farrell, Victoria Koplas & Emma Parkhurst for Legally Blonde

       Nonnewaug High School: Natalie Shreve for Footloose

 

10. BEST HAIR AND/OR MAKEUP DESIGN:

       Ellington High School: Renae Giard, Grace Palmer, Meadow Hadzopulos, Jamiee DelPiano, Sadie Sanville & Emily Mead for The Endless Arc

       Torrington High School: Anna Clinkscales for In The Heights

       Immaculate High School: Brianna McDonough & Ayanna Simmons for Twelfth Night

       Pomperaug High School: Marina Matozzo, Emily Douyard, Katharine Bonomo, Claire Eastwood, Naia Lehtinen, Grace Needham & Aya Alhabbal for A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Lauralton Hall: Rory Woods for Spamalot

       Farmington High School: Rebekah Moses for The Crucible

       Westbrook High School: Marilyn Ulanowicz & Gabby Bibisi for Legally Blonde

 

11. BEST LIGHTING DESIGN AND/OR EXECUTION:

       St. Luke's School: Jacqui Holzberger & Alex Insoft for Urinetown

       Ellington High School: Will Daigle, Spencer Leach, Sophia Reale & Sydney Avtges for The Endless Arc

       Newington High School: Lucy Slattery for Beauty And The Beast

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Robbie Eselby for The Visit

●       Chase Collegiate School: Brendan Wilmot for The Taming Of The Shrew/Gypsy

       Shepaug Valley High School: Noah Ciccamarro for The 1940s Radio Hour

       Nonnewaug High School: Dean Jones & Jack Corso for Footloose

       Cromwell High School: Camryn Duff for Almost, Maine

 

12. BEST SOUND DESIGN AND/OR EXECUTION:

       Ellington High School: Evan Berak, Camden Angell & Alice Mahon for The Endless Arc

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Jack Rogerson & Joe Leach for It's A Wonderful Life

       Farmington High School: Matias Semsetting & Grace Duncan for The Crucible

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Kevin McGrath & Lily McGrath for The Visit

       Westbrook High School: Max Lyman & Gavin LaBrec for Radium Girls/Legally Blonde

●       Chase Collegiate School: Jakob Gati for The Taming Of The Shrew/Gypsy

       The Gunnery: Sophia Novoa for Arsenic And Old Lace

       Shepaug Valley High School: Maxwell Krantz for The Stranger/The 1940s Radio Hour

 

13. BEST SCENIC DESIGN AND/OR EXECUTION:

       Watertown High School: Hannah Mehlin & Diana Ghisa for Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Shepaug Valley High School: Kayleigh McKay for The Stranger

       Ellington High School: Sam Oravitz, Audrey Davis, Tim Schafer, Lauren Lagasse & Sophia Reale for Summer Share

       Guilford High School: Ian Anderson, Matt Moore, Connor Sullivan & Mia Bloss for School Of Rock

●       Chase Collegiate School: Aneesh Avancha, Kevin McDonald & Nathaniel Zembruski for The Taming Of The Shrew

       Newington High School: Stephanie Treviso & Justin Field for Beauty And The Beast

       The Gunnery: Charles DeVos, Hailey Lovallo, Ross O'Connor for Rent

       W.F. Kaynor Technical High School: Samantha Braker, Kayleigh LaRose, Samantha McLaughlin & Paula Williams for Seussical The Musical

       Nonnewaug High School: Breanna Harding, Leah Hungerford, Jack Corso, Glen Jameson, Dean Jones, Evan Brown, Elyza Bruce & Ava Cawley for Footloose

 

14. BEST PROPS DESIGN AND/OR MANAGEMENT:

       Ellington High School: Alex Audet, Hunter Harrell & Jack Soto for Summer Share

       Guilford High School: Christopher Miller for Metamorphoses/School Of Rock

       Westbrook High School: Elnora Amenta for Radium Girls

       Immaculate High School: Kristen LeFebvre for Grease

       Newington High School: Grant Garcia for Beauty And The Beast

       Pomperaug High School: Katharine Dowling & Isabella Storey for Cloak And Dagger

       The Gunnery: Acadia Johnson & Sophia Novoa for Arsenic And Old Lace

       W.F. Kaynor Technical High School: Alyssa Hernandez, Jasmin Flete & Jah'Tavia Lassiter for Seussical The Musical

       Bristol Eastern High School: Ally McMahon & Maddie Bourassa for All Shook Up

 

15. BEST SPECIAL EFFECTS

       The Taft School: CJ Silverman for The Tragedy Of Hamlet

       W.F. Kaynor Technical High School: Raul Calderon & Samantha Braker for And Then There Were None

       The Gunnery: Clare Costello for Rent

       Stonington High School: Emmett Anderson for 9 To 5

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Cameron Jirowetz & Jack Rogerson for It's A Wonderful Life

 

16. BEST RUNNING CREW:

       The Taft School: Run Crew for Footloose

       Classical Magnet School: Run Crew for Our Town

       Holy Cross High School: Run Crew for A Flea In Her Ear

       St. Luke's School: Run Crew for Urinetown

       Ellington High School: Run Crew for The Endless Arc

       Watertown High School: Run Crew for Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Immaculate High School: Run Crew for Grease

       Cromwell High School: Run Crew for Almost, Maine

       New Britain High School: Run Crew for The Addams Family

 

17. BEST STAGE MANAGMENT:

       Kinsella Magnet School: Michelle Maldanado (PSM), Sara Johns (SM) for Working

       Holy Cross High School: William Guglielmo, Caitlin Dreyer & Omofolade Olusanya for A Flea In Her Ear

       Immaculate High School: Kevin McCoy & David Mercier for Grease

       Greater Hartford Arts Academy: Callum McCabe (SM), Tessa Trotta-Smith (ASM) for A Chorus Line

       Guilford High School: Jackson Fischbach (PM), Isobel Nairn (SM), Natalia Torrington High School: Sofia Frauenhofer & Gillian Hart for In The Heights

       Newington High School: Carly Saindon (PSM), Abigail Goia & Cassie Mayer (ASMs) for Beauty And The Beast

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Duncan DeMichiel (PSM), Chloe Martin (SM) for The Visit

       Bristol Eastern High School: Sara Parish, Kaylie Masi (PSMs), Paige Lavoie (ASM) for All Shook Up

 

18. BEST ORIGINAL PROGRAM COVER DESIGN OR ARTWORK

       Bristol Eastern High School: Ally McMahon for All Shook Up

       W.F. Kaynor Technical High School: Mahogany Russel for And Then There Were None

       Nonnewaug High School: Dean Jones for Footloose

       Watertown High School: Diana Ghisa for Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       St. Luke's School: Meg Adams for Urinetown

       Kinsella Magnet School: Dean Martin for Working

 

19. BEST ORCHESTRA:

       Ellington High School: A Charlie Brown Christmas

       Watertown High School: Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Guilford High School: School Of Rock Onstage Band

       Bristol Eastern High School: All Shook Up

       Newington High School: Beauty And The Beast

 

20. BEST INCIDENTAL OR ORIGINAL MUSIC IN A PLAY:

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Peter Kershaw for Appointment With Death

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Maddie Giacconi for The Visit

       Guilford High School: William Breeze for Metamorphoses

       Watertown High School: Fjoralba Mukollari for The Great All-American Musical Disaster

       W.F. Kaynor Technical High School: Raul Calderon for And Then There Were None

 

21. BEST DANCING:

       The Taft School: Footloose

       Kinsella Magnet School: Working

       Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts: A Chorus Line

       Newington High School: Beauty And The Beast

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Memphis

       Torrington High School: In The Heights

       St. Luke's School: Urinetown

       Stonington High School: 9 To 5

       Immaculate High School: Grease

 

22. BEST FEATURED DANCER(S)

       Kinsella Magnet School: Adalise Loubriel in Working

       Immaculate High School: Zach Demko & Jillian Fredette in Grease

       Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts: Madeline Duval in A Chorus Line

       Torrington High School: Aubrie Dell'Agnese in In The Heights

       Wolcott High School: Elizabeth Lacombe in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Newington High School: Shawn Olegario in Beauty And The Beast

       New Britain High School: Victoria Farrell in The Addams Family

 

23. BEST CHOREOGRAPHER:

       The Gunnery: Gabby Lescadre, Sabryna Coppola & Katie Nemergut for Rent

       Stonington High School: Kaira Wiltshire for 9 To 5

       Lauralton Hall: Caron Kim & Carolyn Canavan for Spamalot

       Torrington High School: Aubrie Dell'Agnese for In The Heights

       New Britain High School: Elizabeth Farrell & Victoria Farrell for The Addams Family

       Bristol Eastern High School: Emma Guilmette, Delaney Campisano & Julianna Marsh for All Shook Up

 

24. BEST SPECIALTY ENSEMBLE IN A PLAY:

       Guilford High School: Scene 4: Erysichthon in Metamorphoses

       The Taft School: Milan Moudry, Tania Tsunik, Gerry Calles, Will de Melo, Louise Gagnon & Mihir Nayar as The Six Hamlets in The Tragedy of Hamlet

       Ellington High School: Rachel Bingham, Erin Bingham, Aadhya Lal, Clare Palmer & Kavya Sajeev as The Apparitions in The Endless Arc

       Cromwell High School: They Fell in Almost Maine

 

25. BEST SPECIALTY ENSEMBLE IN A MUSICAL:

       The Taft School: Cami Long, Sarah Roychowdhury & Jasmine Galante as Rusty, Wendy Jo & Urleen in Footloose

       Shepaug Valley High School: Henry James, Julia Billings & Ellie Schmus as B.J., Connie & Ginger for Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy in The 1940s Radio Hour

       Kinsella Magnet School: Emmylou Rae as Roberta Victor & Company for If I Could've Been in Working

       Farmington High School: Samantha Scheidel, Elena Jimenez-McDermott & Quinn Mahoney as Hodel, Tzeitel & Chava for Matchmaker in Fiddler On The Roof

       Wolcott High School: Courtney Keane, Reagan Smith, Ava Onofreo, Kate Styles & Kelsey Guinipero as The Ladies Quintet in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

●       Chase Collegiate School: Kathleen Green & Kennedy Morris as Louise & June in Gypsy

       Holy Cross High School: I Feel Pretty in West Side Story

       Greater Hartford Academey of the Arts: Ariana LoCascio, Biance Feiner & Taylor Esposito as Sheila, Bebe & Maggie for At The Ballet in A Chorus Line

       Torrington High School: Ashlyn Bernard, Serena Rosado, Emily Vasquez & Vivian Jimenez-Rijo as Carla, Nina, Vanessa & Daniela for Ne Me Diga in In The Heights

 

26. BEST CHORUS:

       Stonington High School: 9 To 5

       Watertown High School: Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Memphis

       Guilford High School: School Of Rock

       Torrington High School: In The Heights

       Wolcott High School: Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Newington High School: Beauty And The Beast

       The Taft School: Footloose

       St. Luke's School: Urinetown

 

27. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A PLAY:

       St. Luke's School: Michael Crispi as Robert in Boeing-Boeing

●       Chase Collegiate School: Trey Atkins as Grumio in The Taming Of The Shrew

       Shepaug Valley High School: Alvin Hermans as Mrs. Higgins in The Stranger

       Newington High School: Justin Field as Mr. Kimber in George Washington Slept Here

       Classical Magnet School: Neo Valentin as George Gibbs in Our Town

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Benjamin Black as Burgomaster in The Visit

       Farmington High School: Lucien Griffin as Reverend John Hale in The Crucible

       Ellington High School: Evan Sideris as Dane Tesla in The Endless Arc

 

28. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A PLAY:

       Pomperaug High School: Isabella Watson as Chantelle Chanson in Cloak And Dagger

●       Chase Collegiate School: Kathleen Green as Bianca in The Taming Of The Shrew

       Classical Magnet School: Vanessa Rayne as Julia Gibbs in Our Town

       Westbrook High School: Merry Farrell as Kathryn Schaub in Radium Girls

       Torrington High School: Alexia Fox as Mercutio in Romeo And Juliet

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Molly Stanton as Teacher in The Visit

       Farmington High School: Rebekah Moses as Mary Warren in The Crucible

 

29. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MUSICAL:

       St. Luke's School: Michael Crispi as Caldwell B. Cladwell in Urinetown

       Guilford High School: William Breeze as Ned Schneebly in School Of Rock

       New Britain High School: Robert Breau as Uncle Fester in The Addams Family

       Newington High School: Matthew Plourd as Lumiere in Beauty And The Beast

       Lauralton Hall: Mark Bissell as Sir Lancelot in Spamalot

       Farmington High School: Matt Plona as Perchik in Fiddler On The Roof

       The Taft School: Gerry Callas as Jack in Into The Woods

 

30. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL:

       The Taft School: Kaedi Dalley as Vi Moore in Footloose

       The Gunnery: Gabby Lescadre as Maureen in Rent

       Watertown High School: Allison VanDerlyn as Fairy Godmother in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

●       Chase Collegiate School: Kathleen Greene as Louise in Gypsy

       Immaculate High School: Claire Goode as Betty Rizzo in Grease

       Torrington High School: Alexia Fox as Abuela Claudia in In The Heights

       New Britain High School: Leah Gafney as Wednesday Addams in The Addams Family

       Stonington High School: Emily Kulick as Meg in Little Women

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Julia Rocchio as Gladys in Memphis

       Wolcott High School: Sara Waddington as Fairy Godmother in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

 

31. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A COUPLE OR DYNAMIC DUO IN A PLAY:

       Pomperaug High School: Emily Puglisi & Isabella Watson as Sarah Scientist #1 & #2 in A Most Curious Phenomenon

       St. Luke's School: Henry Jodka & Amelia Wyckoff as Bernard & Gloria in Boeing-Boeing

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Hannah Kronengold & Heaven Diaz as Blind Man 1 & Blind Man 2 in The Visit

       Classical Magnet School: Linda Shewokis & Neo Valentin as Emily & George in Our Town

       Holy Cross High School: Galvin Brayton & John Vito as Lucienne & Carlos in A Flea In Her Ear

       Westbrook High School: Finn McGannon & Kelsey Xenelis as Arthur & Diane Roeder in Radium Girls

       The Gunnery: Lois Bachman & Sabryna Coppola as Abby & Martha Brewster in Arsenic And Old Lace

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Isaac Manfull & Hannah Denette as George & Mary Bailey in It's A Wonderful Life

 

32. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A COUPLE OR DYNAMIC DUO OR MORE IN A MUSICAL:

       The Gunnery: Gabby Lescadre & Clare Costello as Maureen & Joanne in Rent

       Stonington High School: Grace Gilbert, Ivy Allik & Lauren DeCarlo as Violet, Judy & Doralee in 9 To 5

       Watertown High School: Eliya Brennan & Ruba Khazzaka as Joy & Grace in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Wolcott High School: Erin MacDonald & Melissa Green as Grace & Joy in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Bristol Eastern High School: Anna Korpanty & Logan Zdun as Lorraine & Dean in All Shook Up

       Stonington High School: Grace Gilbert as Chloe Kolbenheyer as Jo & Beth in Little Women

       Nonnewaug High School: Michael Keenan & Rebecca Reimold as Willard & Rusty in Footloose

       Notre Dame High School: Thomas Scott & Alex Barbour as Rapunzel's Prince & Cinderella's Prince in Into The Woods

 

33. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A CAST IN AN ENSEMBLE PLAY:

       Cromwell High School: Almost, Maine

       Guilford High School: Metamorphoses

       Holy Cross High School: A Flea In Her Ear

       The Taft School: The Tragedy of Hamlet

       Pomperaug High School: A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Ellington High School: A Charlie Brown Christmas

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Appointment With Death

       St. Luke's School: Five Women Wearing The Same Dress

       W.F. Kaynor Technical School: And Then There Were None

 

34: BEST PERFORMANCE BY A CAST IN AN ENSEMBLE MUSICAL:

       Kinsella Magnet School: Working

       Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts: A Chorus Line

       Shepaug Valley High School: The 1940s Radio Hour

 

35. BEST MALE STANDOUT PERFORMANCE IN AN ENSEMBLE PLAY:

       Cromwell High School: Dakota Vooys for Almost, Maine

       Guilford High School: Parker Toth for Metamorphoses

       Holy Cross High School: Jacob Gannon as Victor Emmanuel Chandebise/Poche in A Flea In Her Ear

       Classical Magnet School: Neo Valentin as Black Stache in Peter And The Starcatcher

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Ryan Kirkpatrick as Dr. Gerard in Appointment With Death

       Ellington High School: Cole Angell as Alan Barton in Summer Share

       W.F. Kaynor Technical High School: Tyler Rivera as Sir Lawrence Wargrave in And Then There Were None

 

36. BEST FEMALE STANDOUT PERFORMANCE IN AN ENSEMBLE PLAY:

       Karley Krickmier for Metamorphoses

       St. Luke's School: Sarah Powless as Meredith in Five Women Wearing The Same Dress

       Ellington High School: Kavya Sajeev as Natasha Borenjov in Summer Share

       Pomperaug High School: Ella Storey as Sarah Young in A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Pomperaug High School: Laura Stango as Sarah Present Day in A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Cromwell High School: Samantha Barrett for Almost, Maine

       Watertown High School: Madison McNulty as Television Announcer in Appointment With Death

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Corrina Palarino as Mrs. Boynton in Appointment With Death

 

37. BEST STANDOUT PERFORMANCE IN AN ENSEMBLE MUSICAL:

       Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts: Geo Mantilla as Paul in A Chorus Line

       Shepaug Valley High School: Ellie Schmus as Ginger in The 1940s Radio Hour

       Shepaug Valley High School: Bridget Snyder as Geneva in The 1940s Radio Hour

       Kinsella Magnet School: Dean Martin as Mike Dillard in Working

       Shepaug Valley High School: Wilson King as Neal in The 1940s Radio Hour

 

38.FEARLESS AWARD:

       Guilford High School: Metamorphoses

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: The Visit

       Holy Cross High School: A Flea In Her Ear

       Ellington High School: The Endless Arc

       St. Luke's School: Five Women Wearing The Same Dress

 

39. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTOR IN A CLASSICAL PLAY:

       The Gunnery: Sam Johnson as Mortimer Brewster in Arsenic And Old Lace

       Shepaug Valley High School: Jack Roush as Dick Lane in The Stranger

       Torrington High School: Justin Torres as Romeo in Romeo And Juliet

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Ryan Delayo as Anton Schill in The Visit

       St. Luke's School: Henry Jodka as Bernard in Boeing-Boeing

       Farmington High School: Matt Plona as John Proctor in The Crucible

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Philip Nelson as The Speaker in A Piece of Monologue in Beckett Shorts

●       Chase Collegiate School: Joey Leszczynski as Petruchio in The Taming Of The Shrew

       Newington High School: Joshua Mains as Newton Fuller in George Washington Slept Here

 

40. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTRESS IN A CLASSICAL PLAY:

       St. Luke's School: Amelia Wyckoff as Gloria in Boeing-Boeing

       Farmington High School: Camille Hoheb as Abigail Williams in The Crucible

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Chloe Glassel as Claire Zachanassian in The Visit

       Classical Magnet School: Gabby Kunzika as Stage Manager in Our Town

       Classical Magnet School: Linda Shewokis as Emily Webb in Our Town

       The Gunnery: Sabryna Coppola as Martha Brewster in Arsenic And Old Lace

       Immaculate High School: Ilona Lundanyi as Viola/Caesario in Twelfth Night

       Torrington High School: Gianna DelMonte as Juliet in Romeo And Juliet

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Jordyn Valentin as May in Footfalls in Beckett Shorts

 

41. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTOR IN A CONTEMPORARY PLAY:

       Westbrook High School: Finn McGannon as Arthur Roeder in Radium Girls

       Ellington High School: Trevor Burch as Nikola Tesla in The Endless Arc

       Pomperaug High School: Ben Bernard as Nick in Cloak And Dagger

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Isaac Manfull as George Bailey in It's A Wonderful Life

 

42. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTRESS IN A CONTEMPORARY PLAY:

       Westbrook High School: Christine Banks as Grace Fryer in Radium Girls

       Nathan Hale-Ray High School: Hannah Denette as Mary Bailey in It's A Wonderful Life

       Pomperaug High School: Isabella Storey as Lola Malone in Cloak And Dagger

 

43. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTOR IN A CLASSICAL MUSICAL:

       Farmington High School: Tristan Wong as Tevye in Fiddler On The Roof

       Immaculate High School: Zach Demko as Danny Zuko in Grease

       Holy Cross High School: Michael Perkins as Tony in West Side Story

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Jacob Taylor as Tevye in Fiddler On The Roof

●       Chase Collegiate School: Caelan Gadwah-Meaden as Herbie in Gypsy

 

44. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTRESS IN A CLASSICAL MUSICAL:

       Holy Cross High School: Christina Finkenzeller as Maria in West Side Story

       Farmington High School: Rebekah Moses as Golde in Fiddler On The Roof

●       Chase Collegiate School: Veronica Johnson as Rose in Gypsy

       Immaculate High School: Lauren Garvey as Sandy in Grease

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Karissa Cooper as Golde in Fiddler On The Roof

 

45. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTOR IN A CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL:

       St. Luke's School: Henry Jodka as Bobby Strong in Urinetown

       Guilford High School: Parker Toth as Dewey Finn in School Of Rock

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Eric Canfield as Huey in Memphis

       Newington High School: Eric Venables as Beast in Beauty And The Beast

       Torrington High School: Justin Torres as Usnavi in In The Heights

       The Taft School: Tattnall Holt as Ren McCormack in Footloose

       Watertown High School: Jewell Hearon as Prince Christopher in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       The Taft School: Peter Dzubay as The Baker in Into The Woods

       Westbrook High School: Binak Cecunjanin as Emmett Forrest in Legally Blonde

 

46. BEST PERFORMANCE BY A LEADING ACTRESS IN A CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL:

       Stonington High School: Grace Gilbert as Jo March in Little Women

       St. Luke's School: Kayleigh Bowler as Hope Cladwell in Urinetown

       Cromwell High School: Jillian Millette as Elle Woods in Legally Blonde

       Watertown High School: Julia Squillace as Cinderella in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Notre Dame High School: Courtney Durso as The Witch in Into The Woods

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Zani Scott as Felicia in Memphis

       Guilford High School: Dana Shelton as Rosalie Mullens in School Of Rock

       Lauralton Hall: Alanna Murphy as Lady Of The Lake in Spamalot

       Wolcott High School: Gabrielle Hamel as Cinderella in Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

 

47. BEST CLASSICAL PLAY:

       Holy Cross High School: A Flea In Her Ear

       The Taft School: The Tragedy Of Hamlet

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: The Visit

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Appointment With Death

       Farmington High School: The Crucible

       Shepaug Valley High School: The Stranger

●       Chase Collegiate School: The Taming Of The Shrew

       St. Luke's School: Boeing-Boeing

       Classical Magnet School: Our Town

 

48. BEST CONTEMPORARY PLAY:

       Guilford High School: Metamorphoses

       Ellington High School: A Charlie Brown Christmas

       Pomperaug High School: A Most Curious Phenomenon

       Ellington High School: The Endless Arc

       St. Luke's High School: Five Women Wearing The Same Dress

       Westbrook High School: Radium Girls

       Cromwell High School: Almost, Maine

 

49. BEST CLASSICAL MUSICAL:

       Immaculate High School: Grease

       Holy Cross High School: West Side Story

       Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts: A Chorus Line

●       Chase Collegiate School: Gypsy

       Northwestern Regional 7 High School: Fiddler On The Roof

       Farmington High School: Fiddler On The Roof

 

50. BEST CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL:

       Kinsella Magnet School: Working

       Guilford High School: School Of Rock

       Stonington High School: 9 To 5

       Newington High School: Beauty And The Beast

       St. Luke's School: Urinetown

       Stonington High School: Little Women

       Waterbury Arts Magnet School: Memphis

       Watertown High School: Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

       Torrington High School: In The Heights

 

May, the most frenetic month of school, is here and certainly living up to its billing.  The calendar is jammed with AP testing, senior exams, Prom, the Athletic Banquet, various field trips, health and wellness programs, and special daily schedules to accommodate things like year book distribution, Pre-ACT for the sophomores, the spring music concert, the senior breakfast, and students visiting from a local elementary school.

I found myself feeling the pressure when two different faculty members asked if they could have a few minutes to address the entire US about their professional growth projects, and I told them they should have asked in March or April because there is absolutely no time left on the calendar. As the second teacher left my office disappointed in the fact that they may not get to share their work with students and colleagues, I realized my anxiety was building around the calendar and all the upcoming events so I took a moment to practice a mindfulness technique that I have used in the past.  I sat upright in my chair, placed my hands on my thighs, closed my eyes and began to focus on my breathing.  I inhaled through my nose, being sure to take a full breath and out through my mouth making sure the entire breath cycle lasted at least 5-7 seconds.  I let go of my thoughts of the calendar and focused solely on my breathing, visualizing the oxygen entering my nose, moving down into my lungs and finally exiting through my mouth.  I continued this for about a minute.  When I was done, I turned toward the calendar and wrote out a short priority list in regards to immediate and long-term tasks that needed to get done; I then got up from my desk and went out into the hall to greet students and check-in with faculty.  The reason I write about this moment is with all that is happening in the next month, it is important that as adults we maintain a level of clarity and calmness, as our students take their cues from us. These times can be stressful for both parent and student alike, but if we acknowledge the stress and use techniques like mindfulness and prioritizing exercises to reorient and process that stress, we can help our kids deal with theirs. 

When I walked out of my office and into the hall to greet students, I asked my usual questions: "How is it going?", "All good today?", "Anything you need?"  Their responses were generic: "It's going well", "Everything's good", "I am all set; thanks for asking." I walked back to my office knowing that some of those students who responded in a positive way were actually feeling the breakneck pace of the year and were a bit overwhelmed. My questions were not asked with the intention of a student bearing their soul in the middle of the hallway, but instead they are asked as a way of building a bridge and letting students know that I am here if they need me.  As parents, we need to dive a bit deeper with our dinner table questions with the intention of taking the temperate of our kids' stress level and then helping them navigate ways to relieve that stress and deal with those things that loom large in their minds.  Be sure and ask those questions at the dinner table that don't merit a monosyllabic one-word answer, but require them to talk a bit.  Some possible questions are: "What was the best part of your day?", "What was challenging for you today?", "What is something you did today that made you proud?", "Tell me about a contribution or comment you made in class?".  My son is an expert at turning an open-ended question into a one-word answer so I will follow up with: "What makes you say that?" as a way extend the conversation and dive deeper.  Finally, as students share with you both the good and the bad of the day, look to find a place to say: "Well, what's your plan?  What are next steps?" and speak with them about strategies to deal with stressful situations and remind them of the resources they have in their teachers and advisors here at Chase.            

~ Mr. Palmgren
Head of Upper School

In the fall, one could not have possibly imagined that seventh graders would be delivering the spring Declamation in a Ted Talk style just a few months later!  From standing behind a podium in December to strolling confidently across the stage in May, seventh graders demonstrated their growth as writers and public speakers.  Each student touched on several of Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences, sharing the impact of those intelligences on the world, and more importantly, on their own lives. Through preparation, practice and an innate passion for the subject, seventh graders captivated the audience! Each student left the Recital Hall feeling a sense of pride and accomplishment.

As members of the audience, current sixth graders were astounded by the performance of their more experienced peers.  They noted expertise in eye contact, movement, modulation of voice and confidence.  Next year, it will be their turn, and I cannot wait for this experience to shape their seventh grade year! 

~ Ms. Bickley
MS English & History Teacher

 

Have you ever wondered who invented basketball? Did you know that the invention of Silly Putty was initially an accident? How did Life Savers candy become so popular? These are just some of the questions that our second and third graders have been wondering about during our Writer's Workshop lessons as we focus on inventions. From inventions of the 1800's to modern devices of today, each student has begun preparing the steps needed to develop their first research paper of the school year.

The students began by choosing a topic of interest from a list of various inventions. Then, they used their IPads to locate articles related to their topic. Once their articles were found, students highlighted facts and organized their information with color coded papers and notecards. They each carefully began transforming  their notes into well-developed paragraphs. Names of inventors, important dates, marketing and advertising of particular inventions, and ways that  these inventions have changed our lives are just some of the sub-topics included in our research papers. The skill of paraphrasing has been an important part of the research process, as the students are learning how to take information they learn and put it into their own words. All resources used will be cited with the assistance of Ms. Paine during Library class.

Our recent Writer's Workshop lessons have been full of facts that surprise us and make us wonder, which in turn initiates the drive to research more nonfiction material. Hearing our students ask each other about the inventions they are studying provides the opportunity for our students to teach each other as well. Thus, one student who is studying a particular invention will come away with facts about a whole new invention, as our students have been encouraged to share their knowledge with their peers. It's been the perfect blend of independent research and sharing information with each other. More sharing will take place once we polish our first drafts and type out our final copies.

 

~ Ms. Cappola
Second/Third Grade Teacher

 "Candle in the Wind" Chemistry Lesson

 

As the teacher opened the door to his chemistry lab, ten sophomores quietly entered the darkened room to the music of Elton John's "Candle in the Wind." They noticed the flame of a candle flickering just below a picture of a "romantic dinner" and it captured their attention.

 "What does this have to do with chemistry?" students wondered.

 

Then Mr. Kopecky suddenly asked,  "What is flame?  What is fire?  You might think that you know - but do you?"

The students took turns guessing what the flame is with responses ranging from "really hot air" and combustion reaction" to "burning energy" or "glowing gases." The agenda for the lesson was becoming clear: they would be experimenting with candles to figure out the mystery of fire.

 

This "romantic" lab was the final experiment in the unit on Chemical Reactions that the class has been studying for the last two weeks. This experiment provided  a vivid example of combustion reaction - the most recent type the class learned about.  As the students broke into their lab pairs, they worked together to figure out the many "mysteries" of the burning candle:  "What is the role of the wick?  Where is the flame the hottest?  How is the smoke of a burning candle different from the smoke of the just extinguished flame?  Where does the burned wax ultimately go?"

 

 While some students were intrigued by the "jumping flame" trick, other groups were puzzled by the dark smear that is left on an index card, as it was slowly moved through the middle of the candle's flame.  

 

As the students observed their candle's behavior and gathered evidence to support their original hypothesis about what a flame is, they raised questions such as: Is it just energy, particles of some matter, or both?  It was becoming  clear that the "answer" was more complicated than it seemed and to figure it out would take a while.  Perhaps, even longer than it takes for the candle to burn out...  

 

Students shared their ideas at the next class meeting when all groups presented and discussed their completed particle diagrams of the burning candle experiment.   

 

~ Mr. Kopecky
Upper School Science Chair & Science Teacher

 

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Our K-5 students brought the characters of “Horton Hears the Who” alive in Seussical Kids…the Upper School students in the Highlander Theater Company took us behind the scenes of the Vaudeville stage for a fabulous production of Gypsy…the Middle Schoolers are busy preparing for their upcoming underwater voyage in The Little Mermaid, Jr

What more could be going on in our Musical Theater program you ask?

The Pre-K Spring performance, of course! The youngest learners on our campus got to strut their stuff on Thursday morning in their very own musical theater performance, “On Old MacDonald’s Farm.” These brave 3, 4, and 5 year olds portrayed the cutest animals on the farm as they sang and spoke with joy and confidence!

Connecting with their Pre-K spring curricular theme, the students learned about life on the farm, read great barnyard storybooks, and discovered fun facts about all of the animals. They even put their artistic skills to work as they created their own scenery for the big day. The students practiced using their singing and speaking voices confidently and clearly, and worked on being patient team members throughout the rehearsal process.

Mrs. Fellin, Mrs. Miraoui, and I couldn’t be prouder of their hard work and look forward to seeing these energetic young performers shine on stage for years to come!                            

Keep a look out for a link to the video of the performance coming soon! In the meantime, take a look at the photo gallery here.

 

 

 

~ Mrs. Apland
Music Teacher and Choral Director

Grace under pressure, eloquence, and often humorous delivery are hallmarks of Chase Senior Speeches, and April 27th's group of Chase seniors did NOT disappoint! They honored the individuals they deem most impactful to their lives and convinced their peers it is okay to quit, that people are like museums, and that every chapter counts (to name just a few).

[Chase seniors Caelan Gadwah-Meaden, Dwyer Grimes, Brendan Wilmot, Jane Zhao, Jakob Gati, Yulee Yu, Will Bianchi, Layne Carter, Jaden Faunce, Veronica Johnson, Grace Frohock, Olivia Pettinicchi, and Ryan Aghamohammadi]

 

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Chase Collegiate School
565 Chase Parkway Waterbury, CT 06708
(203) 236-9500

Pre K

Chase’s PreK program will give your child the freedom to explore the world and the structure to become an active, involved learner who is prepared for Kindergarten.

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Lower School

In this safe, nurturing private elementary school, our students explore, take risks and innovate.

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Middle School

The bedrock of this success in this private middle school is the atmosphere of support and trust. At Chase, we honor each student and help them achieve their personal best, through an intensive, daily advisory program.

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Upper School

This private high school gives its students the tools to develop into lifelong learners and innovative thinkers, prepared for the changing landscape of the 21st century. Upon graduation, Chase students are well prepared for college and life beyond.

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Giving

Every gift to Chase has a direct impact on our students and faculty.

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Innovation at Chase

We’ve integrated innovation and design thinking into our traditional curriculum – and created three high and low-tech design labs on campus, providing students the knowledge and space to chart their own course in terms of their approach to a project and the outcome they produce.

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